South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

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Information

Title

South Boston High School World War I Memorial Portraits

Date

Dedicated November 10, 1932.

Description

South Boston High School on November 10, 1932, dedicated 104 photo-based portraits of South Boston men who had died in the war. The framed portraits, approximately 14" high by 11" wide, are in a locked display case in a hallway outside the school auditorium. (The school building is now known as the South Boston Education Complex and houses three schools). Five of the portraits are missing, including that of Michael J Perkins, a Medal of Honor recipient.

This was part of a city-wide effort in which perhaps as many as 1,150 such portraits were unveiled at several public schools on or around Armistice Day, 1932. The city spent two years trying to gather photographs of all of the dead. The portraits dedicated at the other schools--most of which have been shuttered--have not been located.

The portraits are not traditional photographs on paper, but what the news reports call “gold radiotones” produced by the Imperishable Art Company of New York; it appears the portraits are actually photo-based, gold-toned engravings on copper.

Location

Contributing Institution

Mary Ryan