Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)<br /><br />

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Information

Title

Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument (GA)

Creator

McNeal Marble Company (Marietta, GA)

Date

erected April 1919; dedicated May 21, 1919

Description

The Campbell County Soldier Boys Monument, unveiled on May 21, 1919, is the first permanent monument built by popular subscription in Georgia (and perhaps the first such monument in the United States) to honor soldiers who died or were wounded in the First World War.

Explanations of the swiftness of the project begin with its leader, Sheriff George E. Jenkins, who was also the head of the local board of the Selective Service Administration. Fundraising for construction of a monument honoring the Campbell County soldiers began on November 26, 1919, just fifteen days after the armistice was declared. As the local newspaper reported, “all of the men in class one and class five” met at the courthouse by orders of the local board. J.H. McClure spoke of the “heroism of the Campbell county soldiers in France and elsewhere.” They raised approximately $100 on that day alone. Pearl Young was chosen custodian of funds.

On February 14, 1919, The Campbell News reported that the committee had “ordered a monument from McNeal Marble company of Marietta, Ga., which according to specification would be a credit to Campbel[sic] county . . . when completed. It is to be of Winesboro [Winnsboro] Granite and stand 19 feet tall with a base six feet square, the shaft will be about 23 inches which all taken together will be a very handsome monument . . . . All amounts of money, paid by either corporations or individuals will be recorded and the record filed in some safe place and will show in times to come who had part in this good work” (as a research note, these records have not yet been located).

Further fundraising took place during a noon recess of a court session on February 28, where Mr. McClure reminded his audience that “The Campbell county local board was the first in the state to report ready to raise its quota of soldiers, also the first to announce to Washington that it was ready to seal and forward their records. It is also the first to place an order for a monument for our fallen but never forgotten heroes.” The local branch of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics contributed money, as did local schoolteachers and students.

On May 21, at the unveiling and dedication in downtown Fairburn, U.S. Attorney Hooper Alexander gave a speech, as did Mr. McClure, Judge Charles W. Smith and Col. George M. Napier. Being as that local African American soldiers were honored on the monument, the unveiling was an integrated municipal event. With echoes of the “Lost Cause,” however, a World War I veteran, Corporal W.B. Hopkins, shook hands with a Civil War veteran, C.P. Matthews, and fundraising for the town’s Civil War monument began that same day. The total cost of the Campbell County World War I memorial was approximately $1,800.

The Soldier Boys Monument was erected and dedicated before the founding of the American Legion, before the founding of the Gold Star Mothers, before the design, marketing, and dedication of “Spirit of the American Doughboy” statues by E.M. Viquesney, and before the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.

The Memorial was originally located in downtown Fairburn, then the county seat of Campbell County. In 1931, Campbell County was absorbed into Fulton County; Fairburn became part of Fulton County. The monument was moved to Holly Hill Memorial Park in Fairburn in 1968.

The memorial is weathered and showing signs of decay by way of cracks, discoloration, and deterioration of lettering and design detail.

Inscriptions


[side one:] ERECTED 1919 BY THE PEOPLE OF CAMPBELL COUNTY, IN MEMORY OF THEIR SOLDIER BOYS, WHO SERVED IN THE WORLD WAR. LOCAL BOARD G.E. JENKINS, CHRMN. J.H. MCCLURE, SECTY. W.R. CAMP, PHYSN. MRS. W.H. YOUNG, CHF. CLK. UNVEILED MAY 21, 1919.

[side two:] KILLED IN BATTLE WILLIAM ALLEN HOGAN CHATEAU THIERRY. GASTON L. LUCK THOMAS P. THOMAS ARGONNE. / DIED IN CAMP RAYMOND F. CAMP CAMP JACKSON, S.C. JOHN COMER HARRIS CAMP GORDON, GA. /  DIED IN SERVICE CHARLES BERRY COOK H. GLENN SWANSON SIBERIA

[side three:] WOUNDED IN BATTLE JOSEPH L. MORRIS CHATEAU THIERRY. HERMAN C. WHITE SOISSONS. LESTER C. BARRONTON CHATEAU THIERRY. ROBERT JESSE BROCK ST. MIHIEL. JESSE GORDON DUNCAN ST. MIHIEL. OLIVER F. BISHOP CHAMPAGNE. WILLARD WOODFIN WILSON VERDUN. DAVID D. SMITH ARGONNE. ALTON WILSON ABNER THOMAS ESKEW JOHN FRANK GRANGER SOISSONS. JAMES E. COOK ARGONNE. CONYERS CLINE

[side four:] COLORED WOUNDED IN BATTLE WALTER WILLIE BROOM ARGONNE. JOHN W. TOLES JR. / DIED IN CAMP EUGENE BROWN SCHENECTADY, N.Y. THOMAS WYNNE NORTH CAROLINA PAUL SMITH FRANCE.

[on globe atop obelisk:] THEIR ALL FOR DEMOCRACY AND FREEDOM OF THE WORLD

Location

Holly Hill Memorial Park, 359 West Broad St.
Fairburn, Fulton County, Georgia

Contributing Institution

Prof. Michael Gunther, Georgia Gwinnett College